Music for relief

These bass lines are often much simpler, yet follow the same basic rules as electric bass lines. You have a couple options for how to go about programming these, but let’s start with the sound.

Seeing that contrast between where she started to where she is now is just so incredible from a fan’s perspective because they know they’ve helped her make that journey.

Songwriters like me often draw from personal life and experience, or from the experiences of those around us; which is probably true of almost any writer in any literary format. But we may also get inspired by and invested in the characters in TV shows, films, and books as well. In fact, it is completely possible to get inspired by anything and everything in the world around you as a creative person. As long as you’re looking for it…

Music investors looking for talent 2019

More and more musicians are choosing to build their own home studios and go it alone these days, as opposed to spending their money on only a few days in a professional studio per year or even less. And that’s great! More agency and self-sufficiency means more time spent honing one’s craft and exploring musical boundaries.

One such example is here in “Let’s Go,” where bassist Benjamin Orr does a double chromatic run in the interlude at the end of the chorus and leading into the “She’s laughing inside” verse. It’s a simple, basic riff, starting at the major third, walking up three notes to the fifth, and continuing with another four-note chromatic run up to the octave. It comes at an opportune moment, building up the suspense leading into the last set of verses, in an already high-tempo, high-energy song.

Meredith Jane Monk is a world-renowned composer, singer, choreographer, filmmaker, artist, and writer. An absolute powerhouse of contemporary art and music alike, she’s been making waves as a composer and performer for over 50 years! Now 76 years old and showing no signs of slowing, Monk continues to be a leading force in extended vocal practices and techniques, and avant-garde performance practices. Her 21st century works have been published by ECM and Tzadik, and a few years back, she was a composer-in-residence at Carnegie Hall. Much is owed to her history of fearless experimentation and her forward-thinking eye toward the body and its sound-making capabilities.

All of our mentored online courses come with six weeks of 1-on-1 professional coaching and feedback on your work. It’s like having a personal trainer, but for music! Share your goals with us and we’ll find a course for you, or create a custom mentorship session with a pro musician, engineer, educator, or music industry veteran, to help you achieve them. 

All of our mentored online courses come with six weeks of 1-on-1 professional support and feedback on your work. It’s like having a personal trainer, but for music! That means you’re not just getting the course content, but a coach to bounce ideas off of and someone invested in your success. Check out our courses such as Songwriting for Producers, Beat Making in Ableton Live, and of course The Art of Hip-Hop Production, and preview any or all for free!

Financial assistance for artists

Focus: Work on making better hip-hop instrumentals to pitch to rappers and vocalists.

All pickups have coils of wire wrapped around a magnet or magnets. Single-coil pickups have one set of these coils, while dual-coil pickups have two. Dual-coil pickups are typically known as humbuckers because they don’t pick up the hum noise that most single-coil pickups do, they “buck” it.

One such example is here in “Let’s Go,” where bassist Benjamin Orr does a double chromatic run in the interlude at the end of the chorus and leading into the “She’s laughing inside” verse. It’s a simple, basic riff, starting at the major third, walking up three notes to the fifth, and continuing with another four-note chromatic run up to the octave. It comes at an opportune moment, building up the suspense leading into the last set of verses, in an already high-tempo, high-energy song.

Early in my career as an electric bassist, I was hired to play in a wedding band. Right off the bat, this meant adding thirty or so tunes from Billboard’s holy list to my existing repertoire in about three days’ time. That first gig went pretty well, and with a few hours of having new material under my belt, I figured I was through the thick of it… but no. The coming months saw a stream of strangers’ special days, each of which came with its very own, personalized collection of “Today’s Hits.” For a while there, I was learning tunes in real time (and thanks to some off-the-setlist song requests, there were definitely times when that was happening in a very literal sense). Unsurprisingly, the experience made my ear more accurate and even enhanced my melodic and harmonic vocabularies.

Let’s examine the guitar more closely. Imagine that the guitar’s low E string has a frequency of 1 Hz. (It’s really 82.4069 Hz; feel free to multiply everything in this next section by that number if you want actual frequencies.) You want your high E string to be tuned two octaves higher than the low one, at 4 Hz. Let’s see if you can get there by tuning the strings pairwise.